Archive for May 27th, 2008

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The Future. Welcome to it.

May 27, 2008

Courtesy to Acephalous (via Martin G.):

A cockney squirrel raps Wordsworth’s “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud.”

Wikipedia has the lyrics (er…words) so you can sing along.

This entry was posted by: Jim
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Stanley Fish and the Conservative Agenda

May 27, 2008

This is not a political blog but it is a blog that is concerned with the state of the humanities and as a consequence with how humanities subjects are taught in our institutions of higher education. With that in mind I point you to (Floridian) Stanley Fish, writing in The New York Times about the recent decision by the University of Colorado-Boulder to hire a Chair in Conservative Thought and Policy as a way of redressing an imbalance at the “left-leaning” university.

It seems to me that Fish’s argument whether or not he believes it himself (–more on that topic in his post’s comments–) is basically right: university space for the most part is not the appropriate arena for political demagoguery or pedagoguery. It is a place for removed academic inquiry.

If it is proven that something other than academic inquiry is occurring in the classroom, I think we can move on to whether or not hiring–and using Colorado taxpayer money to fund–a conservative dema- or pedagogue is the appropriate course of action to remedy the imbalance.

This entry was posted by: Jim
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Congratulations to Jack Kent Cooke Scholars

May 27, 2008

Each year the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation awards several scholarships to graduating seniors drawn from their Young Scholars Program. The Foundation just released its list for 2008 and two of the twenty-eight recipient have Indiana connections.

One, Ronnye Rutledge, is from Fort Wayne and will be using her $30,000/yr scholarship to attend Harvard University with the goal of working in medicine. The other, Lisa Michelle Vavricka, from Pasadena, Texas, will be attending the University of Notre Dame with the goal of going into diplomacy.

Congratulations to these two and all the other recipients.

This entry was posted by: Jim
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To Digitize in Mass?

May 27, 2008

One of the great “to be or not to be” questions of the digital age, from the Ball State University Libraries’ blog:

The proponents of mass digitization projects argue that it is better to have the digital object on the Web where it is accessible globally today than to wait for one or more months to have it searchable through more robust metadata. That is the same argument that many archivists have used for mass processing. As the call goes out for more digital resources, the mass digitization approach gains appeal to some.

Indeed.

This new push to make library materials available digitally recalls the early 20th century efforts of the Smithsonian Institute–the folklife people specifically who were using relatively new advances in audio and visual recording to create a new class of primary materials. The new technology and the manner in which it allowed us to approach our objects of study combined to expand and refine our cataloging apparatus–in theory and in practice. Questions like this may never get definitively resolved until it ceases to be a viable question.

This entry was posted by: Jim