Archive for June 3rd, 2008

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Future Present

June 3, 2008

Something about the current zeitgeist reminds me of the 1960s, but I may be the only one.

We just started a summer project at the Indiana Humanities Council to ascertain what, and how, our high schoolers are learning about the second half of the twentieth century. One of the participating teachers said that she had once assigned, as an oral history project, interviewing people about their memories of JFK’s assassination. Some of the students said they didn’t know anyone old enough.

Well, it seems to me that a lot more happened in The Sixties (that is, the decade from 1963 to 1975) than in most other eras of America’s history. It was a time of extraordinary happenings. The good news is that our young people are eager to learn about those events, which is fortunate because they’re now living through revolutionary times, just as some of us did back then.

To that extent, it would appear that Faulkner was correct about the past. It’s not.

This entry was posted by: Nancy
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The Joy of the Notebook

June 3, 2008

[via The American Scene]

randsinrepose runs down the pros and cons of notebooks–tons and tons of notebooks. This the first entry I’ve ever read on Rands so I have no idea whether or not I should recommend this blog to anyone, but I love this entry for its content, style, subject and its character–and so I have very high hopes.

This entry was posted by: Jim
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Vintage Baseball

June 3, 2008

I was adding the Eight Men Out Tour to the front page of the IHC website today which reminded me of what is perhaps the most awesome part (next to the tour of my office space–the historic home of Meredith Nicholson, of course) of the day long Eight Men Out festivities: the Vintage Baseball Game Round Robin Tournament.

I probably shouldn’t say it, but I’m not a huge fan of baseball. Back in the late 80s I received a one-two punch–Pete Rose-gate and The Strike–and I’ve been out of baseball ever since. But the idea of three baseball games played by 1867 rules sounds just flat spectacular. It’s a sporting event! it’s history! it’s possibly illegal!1 I hope they wear 1867 attire as well.

This entry was posted by: Jim

Photo of Grover Lowdermilk–St. Louis Nationals by The Library of Congress under no known copyright restrictions

1. I’m sure it’s not illegal, but maybe slightly unsafe? I mean, they changed those rules for a reason, right?

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I’m a Sucker

June 3, 2008

[via Ruth’s Blog]

The New York Times yesterday had a fantastic story that relates the only reason I enjoy going to yard sales: the possibility of finding something so completely cool and rare that it might justify countless hours perusing old Avon perfume bottles shaped like cars and books that weren’t worth 25 cents when they were printed.

Two Indiana women on their way back from a camping trip in Kentucky in 2003 bought a zebra-striped trunk only to find inside several black & white prints (and a bunch of old clothes). The prints were from famed tabloid photographer Weegee, the man who helped blaze the path for Diane Arbus and Andy Warhol (among several others).

The Indianapolis Museum of Art, will announce this week the receipt of the collection, meanwhile, the Times website has some of Weegee’s photographs in a slideshow.

This entry was posted by: Jim