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What-are-you-reading-Wednesday: Andrew’s take on Andrew

July 22, 2009

Written by Andrew Glaser. Andrew is a junior majoring in finance at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University. This is his second summer working for the Indiana Humanities Council.

I find few presidents to be quite as interesting as Andrew Jackson. Apparently you have to do quite a lot to get your face on the 20 dollar bill. Those acts include:

  • Refusing to shine a Redcoat’s boots at the age of 14 and being slashed with a sword for your defiance
  • Allowing an opponent in a duel to shoot at you first, killing him after that, and carrying the bullet that hit you in your arm for the rest of your life
  • Beating with your walking stick a would-be assassin whose pistols both mysteriously failed to fire

Joking aside, great presidents tend to be remembered and glorified as larger-than-life, but Jackson was a flawed—and contradictory—man. Though he adopted a Native American orphan to raise as his own (the boy died only a few years later), he was a staunch champion of the removal of Native Americans from their tribal lands, arguing that “red” and “white” people could not coexist in proximity. But, as author Jon Meacham insightfully reminds us, “not all great presidents were always good, and neither individuals nor nations are without evil.”

Meacham’s biography of Andrew Jackson, American Lion, explores the fascinating life of our seventh president, whose views about the presidency still shape the balance of power among the three branches of the federal government. Hate the spoils system? Blame Andy Jackson. Love the president’s power to veto anything he doesn’t like? Thank Andy Jackson.

This isn’t the first biography of Andrew Jackson, but it’s easily the best and most readable, probably because it focuses primarily on his White House years. (Take it from me—I couldn’t even finish the last AJ biography I read. I can only read so much of 18th century Tennessee political life.)

It’s a must read for any history buff—or any aging man seeking inspiration and/or a reminder that 70-something-year-olds can still pack quite a wallop with a well placed cane hit.

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One comment

  1. An appropriate addendum that I just found: http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2009-07-21-CaneFu_N.htm



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